January Prompt: 2018 Shame Statements

2018 thought it could sneak up on us. Not so, you fargin’ icehole. This post may or may not have been written by Roman Moronie. And if you don’t know Roman Moronie maybe you should add Johnny Dangerously to your 2018 Shame Statement.

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It’s time again to consider your Shame! for 2018. Take a moment to review the new Cinema Shame modus operandi. Post/blog/share your Shame Statement before the end of January to be featured in the Cinema Shame monthly roundup. If you need some space to broadcast your plans for 2018, the Shame page is always open for your writing.

When you scratch off one of your Shames, post it wherever you like, share your link with Cinema Shame (via Twitter or email to cinemashame@gmail.com) and we’ll broadcast it to the moon… or at least Sweden so poor Roman Moronie can get a taste.

If you’re new to Cinema Shame and you’d like a sample from past years, here’s @007hertzrumble’s 2017 Shame Statement.

Create your list however you want. Consider friend recommendations, classics you’ve always meant to watch, AFI/BFI/IMDB lists, whatever movie guilt hangs on your conscience — take this opportunity to place your gameplan for 2018 on the Interwebs for all to see. Once it’s out there, you’re obligated to follow through.

For those Penitent Moviewatchers returning for 2018, welcome back. For anyone who has never participated in Cinema Shame, it’s good to have you aboard the Shame train. Embrace your penitence and kneel before the cinema greatness you’ve yet to discover.

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Ain’t that a shame: 2018

I post my writing at Are You Thrilled, but you might have seen me around on Twitter talking about movies at So Long Holly via @movielovebogart . This list has been pulled and pushed, items deleted, replaced, and added back in. Tonight, in the spirit of being decisive, I will leave the list as is, and keep the others for alternates to watch when (if) the first dozen are finished. I watch countless films in a year’s time, but I am such a scofflaw when it comes to yearly resolutions. So let’s have at it–there is no time to lose!

  1. The Deer Hunter

In 2017 I had a list but did not officially post it. The two I remember from that list are Raging Bull , which I wrote about in a stand-alone post, and The Deer Hunter. Here is a clip featuring the late John Cazale

 

It is intense, and violent, well beyond what I usually watch. I can be fluffy inside when it comes to violence. But I am told that at my age it is truly shame-ful to not have seen Deer Hunter, so I will gear up with popcorn and Southern Comfort, and hubby will tell me when to cover my eyes.

2. Johnny Dangerously

3. The Mark of Zorro

Both of these are nods to my husband, as he loves Johnny Dangerously and has talked about it many times. We’ve been married 27 years so it is about time. As for Zorro (1920) we will watch the original with Douglas Fairbanks and perhaps a double feature with the Tyrone Power version. He loves swordfights.

4. Five Easy Pieces

I nicked this from the list of  because it is one I have wanted to see for a long time. I have seen this iconic scene imitated many many times, the best by Alec Baldwin on Comedians in Cars getting Coffee, but I can’t find a clip of it.

 

5. Family Plot

6. Topaz

 

Family Plot and Topaz are two Hitchcock films I have not seen yet. There aren’t many. My favourite is Spellbound.

7. Spartacus

It is kind of embarrassing when someone tosses out a Spartacus reference and I don’t get it. It’s time.

8. Network

9. Chinatown

Here are two movies from the 70’s that most people my age have seen. William Holden in the one, and Faye Dunaway in both. Wowsa, reason enough.

10. Do the Right Thing

Love Spike Lee

11. My Cousin Vinny

I can’t believe I never saw this, but then I was really busy in the 90’s.

Let’s take another look at Faye Dunaway:

 

and last, but surely not least

12. Cactus Flower, with Goldie Hawn, Walter Matthau, and Ingrid Bergman. I have a friend who trades DVD’s with me who promises to bring it to church on Sunday, so I might knock that one off the list this weekend. It looks like great fun–

Episode 8: Citizen Kane / Kristen Lopez

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Kristen Lopez confesses her dirty little secret to the world. She was a film writer and pop culture commentator that had not seen Citizen Kane. She joins James to confess and correct her shame. In this 90-minute conversation Kristen and James exorcise some demons and confront Citizen Kane’s place in film history, film criticism and popular culture. Is it possible to truly appreciate Citizen Kane without a proper cinematic education?

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio

Direct download (right click, save as): http://traffic.libsyn.com/cinemashame/CinemaShame.CitizenKane.mp3

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – First discovered Orson Welles by watching Transformers: The Movie.

Kristen Lopez (@Journeys_Film) – Film writer and pop culture commentator. She also runs the Citizen Dame and Ticklish Business podcasts.

Music Contained in this Podcast:

“Sinfonietta for String Orchestra, Prelude” – Bernard Herrman

“Xanadu” – Olivia Newton-John & E.L.O.

Supplementary Links:

Kristen’s List of Shame on Letterboxd

Citizen Kane (BFI Classics), Laura Mulvey

Citizen Kane: A Filmmakers Journey, Harlan Lebo

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Recorded in December 2017. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Police Story 3: Supercop (1992, Stanley Tong)

Photo 04-01-2018, 03 04 11In my defence I thought I’d seen Police Story 3: Supercop years ago but it turned out to be the spin-off movie Supercop 2 with Michelle Yeah reprising her role from the earlier film and Jackie Chan making a brief cameo. Somewhat confusingly both films have been released in some territories under the title Supercop so in an era where getting hold of HK movies usually involved replying to adverts in martial arts magazines from specialists offering VHS copies at ridiculously high prices I don’t feel too bad about my error. If anything it was great to have another film from that great period between 1982-1994 when Chan was at his peak as a performer.

Photo 04-01-2018, 02 53 57Though a sequel the film also functions as a comeback for Michelle Yeoh after five years away from acting. It’s a buddy movie teaming Chan’s laidback HK police officer with his initially stern Chinese counterpart to take down a drug smuggling kingpin. The film also anticipates the impending handover of Hong Kong from British to Chinese rule by showing the two working together despite their differences.

Photo 04-01-2018, 03 00 07There’s the usual clashes you get in movies about mismatched partners, mostly involving Chan making fun of the Chinese government’s extreme training techniques for their cadets before the two begin to complement each other and become an effective partnership. The plot involves going undercover to infiltrate the network of a drug syndicate run by a jovial Nintendo loving psychopath. While the first two were quite gritty for 80s’ Jackie Chan movies Police Story 3 is much larger in scale and has the feel of a Bond movie. In fact I’m pretty sure the makers of Tomorrow Never Dies (1997, Roger Spottiswoode) must have watched this at least once given Yeoh’s presence in that film and Brosnan’s Bond effectively fulfilling the Chan role as the wise-cracking partner.

As you’d expect from this era in Chan’s career the stunts are life-threatingly insane with Jackie dangling from a helicopter as it flies for miles over the city and Yeoh riding a motor bike onto a moving train. There’s a little too much gunplay which may well be a reaction to the popularity of John Woo movies at the time and Yeoh’s own contributions to the “Girls with Guns” sub-genre which made her a star. The only downside is Maggie Cheung reprising the least rewarding role of her career as Chan’s girlfriend whose presence is meant to provide comic relief but the treatment of her character through this franchise leaves much to be desired.

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Yeoh and Chan (for about 5 minutes) would return for Supercop 2 a year later as would director Stanley Tong. Soon Hollywood would beckon for both of them and I reckon Yeoh has fared better in that respect with a diverse and interesting career. Jackie’s greatest achievements remain the films he made in the 80s’ and early 90s’ and Police Story 3: Supercop is one of the best of them.

 

 

So 2018 is still shameful.

In 2017 not only did I tackle a great many Shames, I also started the Cinema Shame Podcast. As a result, I checked off some unforeseen Shame and helped others scratch their biggest itches.

As a refresher here was my 2017 list (watched):

The Magnificent Ambersons
Five Easy Pieces
The Gold Rush
It’s a Gift
The Black Pirate
Ride the High Country
My Darling Clementine
The Postman Always Rings Twice
Rope
Lifeboat
Friday the 13th
Stop Making Sense
The Commitments
Viva Las Vegas
Zatoichi: The Long Game (completed Zatoichi 1-10)

Additionally I watched the following as a result of the Podcast:

Fatal Attraction
Godfather Part III

Not too bad, if I do say so myself. But that merely sets up 2018 to be one of the most Shameful years in moviewatching history. The Shame! rolls ever onward. Behind every Shame! is another Shame! and still another and still another… you get the picture.

To compile my list for 2018, I took a slightly different approach. Like past years, I consulted by Entertainment Weekly lists and carried unwatched Shame! over. For 2018, however, I solicited lists from my followers on Twitter. Send me your favorite movies, I said! The first four responses contributed to my 2018 Shame Statement.

My trusty Shame! companion:

EW GUIDE TO THE GREATEST MOVIES EVER MADE

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And now on with the shame.

Five Easy Pieces (Bob Rafelson, 1970) – #20 Drama

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Carry over from 2017. I can think of no logical reason I’m avoiding Five Easy Pieces. It’s on my Criterion shelf, readily available.

 

Lifeboat (Alfred Hitchcock, 1944)

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More carryover. A few more Hitches and I’ll have seen all of his sound films.

 

Stop Making Sense (Jonathan Demme, 1986) – #15 Music

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Carryover. Sigh. I’ve built this concert film up in my brain so much that I keep waiting for conditions to be perfect for viewing.

 

The Black Pirate (Albert Parker, 1926) – #8 Action

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I’ve seen my share of Errol Flynn swashbucklers. After seeing Fairbanks’ Zorro on the big screen earlier this year, I’m jazzed to catch up on some of his other films. I’m considering a Quadruple Shame! of The Black Pirate, The Crimson Pirate (1952) starring Burt Lancaster, Vincente Minnelli’s The Pirate (1948), and The Pirate Movie (1982). Maybe I’ll plan an entire week of Pirate movies. Hrm.

 

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (John McNaughton, 1990) – #13 Sci-Fi/Horror

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I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I know plenty about this movie and no part of me wants to watch it. I even swapped it out last year for Friday the 13th without hesitation.

 

Paris, Texas (Wim Wenders, 1984) – courtesy of @emily_dawn

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Wenders is a bit of an enigma for me. I’ve seen a couple of his films and they were fine, but I slacked off after that and Paris, Texas fell by the wayside despite *knowing* I needed check this box. When @emily_dawn shared her favorites list with me and I saw Paris, Texas up at the tippy top, I knew its day had come. #DoItForHarry

 

Wuthering Heights (William Wyler, 1939) – courtesy of @Journeys_Film

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All signs pointed to Wuthering Heights this year. The Pure Cinema Podcast recently lauded Wyler’s film. While digging up Orson Welles information for an upcoming Cinema Shame podcast, I read a fair amount of criticism linking Wuthering Heights and The Magnificent Ambersons. Then Kristen came at me with her list of favorites and Bob’s your uncle.

 

Paper Moon (Peter Bogdanovich, 1973) – courtesy of @arbogast1960

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No excuses. I love Bogdanovich. I own this movie on Blu-ray. I even have the soundtrack on vinyl. I guess I just needed a kick in the pants from @arbogast1960.

 

Sunrise (F.W. Murnau, 1927) – courtesy of @wez_Luigi

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Another obvious choice. @wez_Luigi made me aware I’d forgotten about F.W. Murnau’s masterpiece.

 

The Conversation (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) – courtesy of @ElCinemonster

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Fuel for an upcoming Cinema Shame episode courtesy of @ElCinemonster.

 

Victor/Victoria (Blake Edwards, 1982) – #24 Comedy

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I consulted the EW Guide for my highest rated unwatched comedy. I’ve been meaning to watch Victor/Victoria for many moons.

 

Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968) – #16 Western

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Yeah. Clearly an oversight.

 

Ikiru (Akira Kurosawa, 1952)

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I’ve watched a lot of Kurosawa. Clarification. I’ve watched a lot Kurosawa samurai films. I could fill an entire year of Shame! with the non-Samurai Kurosawas I haven’t seen.

 

Help! (Richard Lester, 1965) – #4 Music

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The EW Guide ranked Help! above A Hard Day’s Night. So I had to see about all the fuss.

 

Ongoing Long Plays:

Zatoichi Criterion Box (Various, 1964-1973)

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I watched the first ten last year, time to finish the job.

 

2018 Cinema Shame List

For the past week I’ve been thinking about what to include in my Cinema Shame list for 2018. With the change in prompt, I’ve decided to limit the overall picks for the year to provide some wiggle room for additional films throughout the year. I used several resources to compile this list including the following: previous shame lists, contributors lists of shame, conversations on twitter, Danny Peary’s film books, various film books by critics and of course the intimidating “to watch pile” (stop judging me unopened Phenomena blu-ray).

2018 Cinema Shame List

Touch of Evil – Orson Welles is a true blind spot in my cinematic viewing.

Malcolm X – Denzel Washington and Spike Lee.

Zardoz – I would say Connery is an icon however I’ve only seen his Bond films and his work from the mid 90s to his retirement.

Two Lane Blacktop – Everybody needs more Warren Oates in their cinematic diet.

The Thing – This will be watched, no matter this will be watched for 2018. It’s been on my list since 2015, I’ve owned the DVD for years and I’ve had the Shout Factory blu-ray for months. This will come off the list.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly – Deaconsden discussion of the western genre in his 2018 Cinema Shame list has pushed this title onto my list. A genre that is sorely lacking in my catalog of watches. Also, this was a previous entry on past Cinema Shame statements.

Pale Rider – A discussion on twitter about Eastwood’s directing made me realize excluding stuff from the past 15 years and Unforgiven, I’ve watched very little of his directed films. Probably the least exciting entry of the group especially after watching Heartbreak Ridge and the first hour of Firefox.

Alien 3 – I like David Fincher and the first two Alien films.

Short Cuts – From the to watch pile and I’ve watched so little Altman.

Hell in the Pacific – Lee Marvin.

Pretty Poison – Recommendation from Danny Peary’s Guide for the Film Fanatic and a co-worker recommended this film within the past month.

Shame Statement 2018

Great to be a part of another year of Shame! I actually accomplished quite a bit. I knocked off a good deal of horror films with Friday the 13th being the big one I wrote about. I also watched and wrote about Straw Dogs which was a very unique viewing experience. Now here we are at 2018 and I have a new list of films to partake of for the first time. This year I want to try for a themed approach. This year I want to focus on westerns, my favorite genre. Not every Shame will be a western though. But I do want to add some more of this genre to my cinematic talking points.

Yojimbo/Sanjuro – Akira Kurosawa

The Hidden Fortress – Akira Kurosawa

The Shooting/Ride the Whirlwind – Monte Hellman

The Revenant – Alejandro G. Inarritu

Romancing the Stone – Robert Zemeckis

A History of Violence – David Cronenberg

Hang em High – Ted Post

One Eyed Jacks – Marlon Brando

McCabe and Mrs Miller – Robert Altman (pray for me here as I typically can not stand Altman films)

Pan’s Labyrinth – Guillermo Del Toro

Ghost in the Shell – Mamoru Oshii

Death Rides a Horse – Giulio Petroni

Wyatt Earp – Lawrence Kasdan