April Prompt: TCM Film Festival

2019_April_TCM

On April 11th, the 10th annual Turner Classic Movie Film Festival will begin in Hollywood. TCMFF celebrates classic films with a jam-packed four-day schedule (April 11th-April 14th) filled with classic film and notable celebrity appearances. In order to share this celebration with the lucky attendees, Cinema Shame will once again be focusing on the films being played at the festival for the month of April. The lists of films scheduled to play are listed below. You can view the official TCMFF schedule here. Maybe you can schedule your watch on the same day as the festival, to join the conversation with those at the festival!

I highly recommend following James Patrick (@007hertzrumble) on twitter, as he will be attending the festival and twittering constantly. Follow the hashtag #tcmff for all discussions and plenty of photos with your favorite Twitter cinephiles. If you follow Cinema Shame and are attending the festival, let us know on twitter and share your experiences. James also previewed the festival with a lengthy post on his blog. 

I’ve picked three movies to knock off the ole Cinema Shame list based on the schedule. After watching Elaine May’s Mikey and Nicky last month, which starred John Cassavetes, I will attempt to watch A Woman Under the Influence. There are at least two movies listed in the festival’s schedule that have been on my Cinema Shame lists in the past, so I will finally knock those off this month: The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (a @007hertzrumble favorite) and longtime Cinema Shame contender, Robert Altman’s Nashville.

As always reach out to us on twitter (@Cinemashame) or via email cinemashame@gmail.com.

2019 Turner Classic Movie Film Festival Website: http://filmfestival.tcm.com/

James will also recording another episode of the Cinema Shame podcast, on location from the Roosevelt Hotel on Thursday with Jessica Pickens (@hollywoodcomet) to talk about the festival and answer your classic-film related questions. 

 

April 11

  • When Harry Met Sally (1989)
  • Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1955)
  • The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947)
  • Dark Passage (1947)
  • The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)
  • Night World (1932)
  • Mogambo (1953)
  • Sergeant York (1941)
  • Ocean’s 11 (1960)

 

April 12

  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
  • Steel Magnolias (1989)
  • Do the Right Thing (1989)
  • The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)
  • Sleeping Beauty (1959)
  • My Favorite Wife (1940)
  • Escape from Alcatraz (1979)
  • Road House (1948)
  • Merrily We Go to Hell (1932)
  • Out of Africa (1985)
  • Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927)
  • Day for Night (1973)
  • Winchester ‘73 (1950)
  • Santo vs. the Evil Brain (1961)
  • The Clock (1945)
  • Love in the Afternoon (1957)
  • A Patch of Blue (1965)
  • Vanity Street (1932)
  • Open Secret (1948)
  • Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)
  • High Society (1956)
  • The Sound of Music (1965)
  • Desert Hearts (1985)
  • The Opposite Sex (1956)

April 13

  • From Here to Eternity (1953)
  • Sleepless in Seattle (1993)
  • Working Girl (1988)
  • Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)
  • Star Wars (1977)
  • Double Wedding (1937)
  • A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
  • A Raisin in the Sun (1961)
  • It Happened Here (1964)
  • Samson and Deliah (1949)
  • When Worlds Collide (1951)
  • Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
  • Father Goose (1964)
  • Nashville (1975)
  • Escape from New York (1981)
  • All Through the Night (1942)
  • Tarzan and His Mate (1934)
  • Love Affair (1939)
  • Blood Money (1933)
  • Life Begins at 40 (1935)
  • Waterloo Bridge (1931)
  • The Student Nurses (1970)
  • The Little Colonel (1935)
  • The Great K&A Train Robbery (1926)
  • Outlaws of Red River (1927)
  • Wuthering Heights (1939)
  • Indiscreet (1958)
  • The Bad Seed (1956)

 

April 14

  • Hello, Dolly! (1969)
  • The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
  • Gone with the Wind (1939)
  • Mad Love (1935)
  • The Robe (1953)
  • A Woman of Affairs (1928)
  • The Dolly Sisters (1945)
  • Holiday (1938)
  • Magnificent Obsession (1954)
  • The Killers (1964)
  • The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • The Defiant Ones (1958)
  • Marty (1955)
  • Yours, Mine and Ours (1968)
  • Cold Turkey (1971)
  • Buck Privates (1941)

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2001 / Stephanie Crawford

Stephanie Crawford returns to the Shame to fulfill her 2001: A Space Odyssey promise (and thereby transcend her human form). 

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – Space Baby believer.

Stephanie Crawford (@scrawfish) – Has now touched the monolith.

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown”

Prince – “1999”

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra – “Also Sprach Zarathustra”

Ray Stevens – “Thus Cracked Henrietta”

2001: A Space Odyssey Shop

2001 – 4K/BDDVD

Soundtrack: 2001 Soundtrack

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Recorded in February 2018. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars (and sanity) are made from this podcast.

Episode 20: Nitrate Picture Show Preview / Deborah Stoiber & Jared Case

Previewing the 2019 Nitrate Picture Show Film Festival with co-directors Deborah Stoiber and Jared Case.

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – Attending his first Nitrate Picture Show Film Festival in May.

Deborah Stoiber – co-director of the NPS

Jared Case – co-director of the NPS

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown” <— Check out Preacher Boy’s music here

Bill Conti – “Gonna Fly Now”

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Recorded in April 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Episode 19: TCMFF 19 / Jessica Pickens

“Live” from the Turner Classic Movies Film Festival with Jessica Pickens (@HollywoodComet).

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – 5th Turner Classic Movies Film Festival, was the holder of ticket #1 for Out of Sight in 2015.

Jessica Pickens (@HollywoodComet) – 6th Turner Classic Movies Film Festival, doesn’t just watch musicals! True story.

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown” <— Check out Preacher Boy’s music here

The Marvelettes – “Mr. Postman”

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Recorded in April 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Episode 18: Boom! / Allan Mott

Allan Mott joins Cinema Shame to discuss Joseph Losey’s incredible disaster, Boom! (1968), starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. 

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – Currently seeking the Boom! soundtrack on vinyl.

Allan Mott (@HouseofGlib) – Watched The Pirate Movie every weekend for a year. 

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown” <— Check out Preacher Boy’s music here

Family Feud Theme

John Barry – “Boom!”

John Barry – “Pain Gone Till Tomorrow” 

Cinema Shame Boom! Shop

Cinema Shame’s Boom! store on Amazon (browse and buy and support the show!)

Boom! – Blu-ray / DVD
John BarryBoom! Soundtrack

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Recorded in February 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

March Prompt: Female-Directed Films

I’m writing in the field today to discuss our March prompt — reporting from lively Salt Lake City, Utah.

This month we are going to focus on a personal blind spot of mine, films by female directors. Along with this month and going forward I’m going to make a strong effort to focus on films directed by women. I recently purchased Alicia Malone’s “The Female Gaze,” which I plan to use as reference material for upcoming watches. It is ridiculous how few female-directed films I’ve seen.

I don’t have any excuse. With all this information at our fingertips, it’s inexplicable that I haven’t made an effort to tap into these resources until now. The only female director’s career I’ve actually followed has been Sofia Coppola. Penny Marshall, Nora Ephron and Kathryn Bigelow have also made a mark. Besides the Shame, what really pushed me to find female-directed films were some statistics Brian Saur (@bobfreelander) mentioned on Pure Cinema Podcast discussing Film Debuts with director Sean Baker. Brian discussed Elaine May’s A New Leaf. Between 1966 and 1971 no studio produced a female-directed film. In 1979, the Directors Guild of America created the Women’s Steering Committee, which released a study that showed between 1949 to 1979, 7,332 films were distributed through the major studios, of those only 14 films were directed by women and three of them were directed by Elaine May. Those are some shocking statistics, I don’t know the current stats but I assume the improvement has been negligible.

For the month of March, I’m planning to watch these films for the first time:

Selma

Ava DuVernay’s Selma

Elaine May’s A New Leaf

Elaine May’s Mikey and Nicky (a pick-up from Criterion’s recent flash sale)

Penny Marshall’s Awakenings

CertainWoman

Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women (second pick-up from Criterion’s flash sale)

So for the month of March, let us know the female–directed films you plan to watch. You can reach us on twitter (@CinemaShame) or by email cinemashame@gmail.com. I am looking forward to the discussion and all the discovery.

@007hertzrumble has created a Cinema Shame Shop on Amazon with treasure trove of suggestions for female-directed films you need to watch.

female-directors

Remember to share your Shame!

@campbelldropout

2019 Oscar Host will be Cinema Shame

With the Oscars right around the corner and airing on February 24th, it’s time to put forth the annual focus on award winners.

Usually, I enjoy the Oscar season, playing catch up with all the nominees and striving to sneak in a viewing of all the Best Picture nominees, but this year, I haven’t even taken time to watch the one that is accessible on Netflix.

oscars-olly-moss

Even though I may not be as hyped about the Oscars this year, I still enjoy the ceremony. I viewed something with an Oscar stamp as a seal of approval. I learned over time, of course, an Oscar nomination or win doesn’t guarantee quality. (If it did then my old James Bond VHS tapes would have been covered in little Oscar statutes.) They were an entryway, a guide for helping me access cinema. Thanks to TCM’s 31 Days of Oscar, I was able to watch dozens upon dozens of Oscar nominated greats… and, well, not-so-greats.

During the month of February, Cinema Shame turns its focus on not just Oscar movies, but Oscar-Winning Performances, specifically Best Actor and Best Actress. Major Oscar performances you have overlooked in the past? Did you not catch Al Pacino’s career-defining (for better and worse) performance in A Scent of a Woman? Maybe you ant to get a grasp on how someone else beat Michael Keaton for his role in Birdman? Ahem. Bruce Dern over McConaughey, as well. 

My major resource, besides recommendations from Cinema Shame contributors and the Cinema Shame podcast, will be Danny Peary’s Alternate Oscars. The book goes from 1927 to 1991 and picks alternates for Best Picture, Actor and Actress. I will choose the performances that Peary did not change, which aren’t many. if you got the royal seal of approval from the Academy and Peary, you must be the cream of the crop. I’m picking four of these performances as my Cinema Shames for the month of February.

And the Oscar for my February Cinema Shame… Best Unwatched Best Performances goes to….

Vivien Leigh’s performance in “A Streetcar Named Desire”

Joanne Woodward’s performance in “The Three Faces of Eve”

Daniel Day-Lewis in “My Left Foot”

Robert De Niro in “Raging Bull”

Raging Bull

While the prompt focuses on performances, feel free to share other Oscar-related Cinema Shames. Let us know about your choices on twitter (@CinemaShame) or by email cinemashame@gmail.com. We look forward to hearing about your Oscar picks.