Noirvember Prompt

Sure. Cinema Shame is hip to the trends. We may have forgotten to actually post our October Horror Movie prompt, but we’re pretty sure you went ahead and hit that Watchlist hard anyway. Since it’s November, let’s just get hard boiled like everyone else.

Your mission should you choose to accept it: watch at least one new FILM NOIR during the month of November and tell us all about it in a blog post, on Twitter, or in a comment on this here watch prompt.

Personally, I just picked up the first volume of the Film Noir Archive and I’ve only seen one film of the nine (Reign of Terror aka The Black Book). That leaves 8 movies just sitting right there waiting for me in the shadows.

As far as other recommendations, I’ll run down a quick list of items I’d hit up if I were you and you hadn’t seen these items.

On the Criterion Channel:

The Complete Films of Jean-Pierre Melville are still streaming on the Criterion Channel. If you’re new to Jean-Pierre Melville, the man propelled the Noir form out of the post-World War II disillusionment into new and hazy moral quandaries.

Start with Bob le flambeur (1956) and watch as his style and pacing becomes more singularly Melvillian through Le doulos (1962), Le samourai (1967) and Le cercle rouge (1970).

On Netflix:

Even Netflix has a few offerings to fuel your Noirvember watching.

Orson Welles’ The Stranger (1946) (co-starring Edward G. Robinson and Loretta Young) might not get as much attention as A Touch of Evil, but it’s more fun, more twisty, and more straight-up Noir. This is Welles forced to contain himself within the Hollywood system. While I love unencumbered Orson, there’s a thrill to watch him force his Orwellian flare into a taught 95 minutes about the hunt for an infamous Nazi in Connecticut. View on Netflix.

Rian Johnson’s breakout low-budget feature Brick (2005) deserves a viewing with the director’s mystery thriller Knives Out (2019) set for release later this month. Brendan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) receives a frantic phone call from his ex-girlfriend just before she’s murdered. He becomes resolved to solve the murder himself by “going undercover” in some cliques of people he’d long avoided. Even though this is set in high school, this is no kiddie drama. View on Netflix.

I’m not just recommending Too Late (2015) because the director — Dennis Hauck — is an old friend of mine. John Hawkes stars in this non-linear meta-noir about a private investigator who gets too close to the missing woman he’s trying to find. Robert Forster also co-stars and we all need to pay our respects. Watch on Netflix.

Available on Netflix DVD

Nicholas Ray’s dark and sizzling In a Lonely Place (1950) starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame remains one of the most affecting first-time watches of the last few years. I keep coming back to this movie because it deals with universal human issues of trust and forgiveness, all wrapped up in a dark morality tale. Rent from Netflix DVD.

Why stop with one Gloria Grahame when you can have twice the fun in Fritz Lang’s The Big Heat (1953). Glenn Ford stars as the battered police detective investigating a sergeant’s suicide. When he becomes a target, the family man seeks revenge. Rent from Netflix DVD.

Reach out on Twitter or email us at cinemashame@gmail.com. Let us know about your first-time Noir watches.

Be sure to check out the two new episodes of the Cinema Shame podcast that dropped last month. They’re not horror or noir, but they’re just good.

Raging Bull w/ Travis Sentell

70’s TV Horror Movies w/ Amanda Reyes and Will McKinley

Tune in next month, when we’ll return with a seasonally appropriate prompt for your viewing roster.

–JP

James David Patrick is a writer. He’s written just about everything at some point or another. Add whatever this is to that list. Follow his blog at www.thirtyhertzrumble.com and find him on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Disclaimer: I earn rewards from DVD.Netflix.com, which has thousands of movies to choose from, many that you won’t find on streaming services. I do this because the availability of physical media is important. The popular streaming notion of “everything available all the time” is a myth. We are always our own best curators. #PhysicalMedia #DVDNation #ad

TV Movie Horror Shamedown / Amanda Reyes & Will McKinley

Amanda Reyes and Will McKinley discuss the impact and legacy of TV movies of the 1970’s, specifically ones of the horrific kind. View the movies discussed on Sony Movie Channel’s showcase of rare TV movies during the 2019 Halloween season

Sony Movie Channel to showcase rarely-shown horror films mostly from the 70’s with double features played twice every night beginning at 8pm ET Friday October 25th – Wednesday October 30th, and Halloween Marathon Thursday, October 31 9:00am – 2:00am ET.

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

Direct download (right click, save as): http://traffic.libsyn.com/cinemashame/CinemaShame_TV-movie.mp3

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – TV movie shamed.

Amanda Reyes (@madefortvmayhem) – Author, podcaster, editor of the anthology Are You In The House Alone: A TV Movie Compendium 1964-1999

Will McKinley (@WillMcKinley) – Resident Old Movie TV Weirdo

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown”

The ABC Sunday Night Movie Theme

“The Blob” – The Five Blobs

The Andy Griffith Show Theme

The Love Boat Theme

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Recorded in October 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Raging Bull / Travis Sentell

Screenwriter and author Travis Sentell goes toe-to-toe with Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull.

Subscribe on iTunesStitcher Radio / Spotify

Direct download (right click, save as): http://traffic.libsyn.com/cinemashame/DorisDay.mp3

CREDITS:

Screenwriter and author Travis Sentell goes toe-to-toe with Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull.

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – Punch drunk for boxing podcasts

Travis Sentell (@travissentell) – Once baptized our host with a super soaker

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown”

The Price is Right Theme

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Recorded in October 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Heating up August with Erotic Thrillers

With August the dog days of summer are upon us (even though July brought that massive heatwave). Cinema Shame is planning to perpetuate the sizzle by focusing on the classy, uber-sophisticated world of the erotic thriller. A sub-genre of films that could really make family movie nights awkward.  Yeah, I’m looking at you, Xenia Onatopp. Your orgasmic coup de grace techniques always had me scrambling for the remote.

Xenia

Death by sexual healing.

When I think of the erotic thriller sub-genre, the first thing that comes to mind is direct to video refuse or heavily-edited features on USA Network. My turning point was watching “The Last Seduction” last November. Linda Fiorentino (a @007hertzrumble obsession, by the way) and dark neo-noir compelled me to investigate the genre further.

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Obligatory Linda Fiorentino in The Last Seduction picture.

In Robert Barton Palmer’s book Hollywood’s Dark Cinema: The American Film Noir, he refers to the “erotic thriller as a direct descendent of the film noir.” Here I was judging these films for having a plot to tie sex scenes together. It also felt like a good time to cleanse the mind of the mindless summer blockbuster. So for this month, I plan to tackle the following erotic thrillers: Paul Schrader’s American Gigolo and Cat People and Lawrence Kasdan’s Body Heat.

catpeople

Reach out to us on twitter (@cinemashame) or by email (cinemashame@gmail.com) with your essential erotic thrillers. 

@campbelldropout

June Prompt – 1989

This June marks the 30th anniversary of Tim Burton’s Batman. A film with huge cultural significance, positive and negative — as it forever it changed the summer blockbuster landscape. The entire summer slate of 1989 has to be one of the greatest in film history for sequels, blockbusters and surprise hits.

Consider that during just a few months, the summer of 1989 begat Ghostbusters II, Lethal Weapon 2, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Licence to Kill, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, The Abyss, and Do the Right Thing.

And so far I’ve just mentioned the summer releases. The entire year boasted en entire roster of films worthy of discovery (or rediscovery). I would have been around three so there are no solid memories of this year for me, except vague memories about Hardee’s promotion of Ghostbusters II. I guess Licence to Kill would have been too much for a child’s happy meal toy, kids probably couldn’t handle a shark-mangled Felix Leiter toy.

For more discussion of non-summer related releases from 1989, we have our in-house resident expert, James Patrick (@007hertzrumble), whose personal website has posted some great discussion on films from that year. It is a great resource if you want to scroll back through a few of these releases you might have missed.

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I’m limiting my choices to three, but I have a feeling I will be doing more rewatches of 1989 films. My biggest shame release from 1989, which has had a lot of talk in the film twitter vacuum, is Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. (See James’ conversation here.) I’ve seen bits and pieces over the years but never took the time to watch the entire film. I’ve owned The Dream Team (another entry that James has lauded) for at least a year now without watching it and it would be interesting to compare Keaton’s performance to his role in Batman. The last movie I will pick from 1989 will be Steven Soderbergh’s Sex, Lies and Videotape. I will always take this opportunity to toss a Criterion release into the mix.

sex-lies-and-videotape-movie-eight

Reach out to us on twitter (@cinemashame) or by email (cinemashame@gmail.com) with your Cinema Shames from 1989 or 1989 recommendations.

Batman1989

Future Prompts — Coming Soon to Shame Near You!

July – Cult Films

August – Racy Films (SCANDALOUS!)

@campbelldropout

The Doris Day Rememberathon

I invited some friends to come on the Cinema Shame Podcast to celebrate the life and work of Doris Day. We discuss some of her personal history and many of her films, most notably It’s a Great Feeling, Starlift, Calamity Jane, Love Me or Leave Me, and Pillow Talk. I’ve cut in many of her wonderful songs and an interview with Robert Osborne on her 90th birthday.

Subscribe on iTunesStitcher Radio / Spotify

Direct download (right click, save as): http://traffic.libsyn.com/cinemashame/DorisDay.mp3

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – Really likes Caprice

Alan Hait (@alanhait) – #OldMovieWeirdo and #TCMParty denizen

Danny Reid (@PreCodeDotCom) – Lord of the Pre-codes.

Jessica Pickens (@HollywoodComet) – Writing about Musicals at Comet Over Hollywood since 2009. 

Raquel Stecher (@RaquelStecher) – Classic and indie film writer. 

Clips Contained in this Podcast:

Doris Day – “Que Sera Sera”

Doris Day on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson 1974

It’s a Great Feeling Trailer

Doris Day – ‘It’s a Great Feeling”

Robert Osborne interviews Doris Day on her 90th 🎂 

Calamity Jane trailer

Starlift trailer

Clip from Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine

Caprice trailer

Doris Day – “S’wonderful”

Robert Osborne introduces Love Me Or Leave Me on TCM 2015

Love Me Or Leave Me trailer

Doris Day – “10 Cents a Dance”

Pillow Talk trailer

Bells are Ringing trailer

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown” <— Check out Preacher Boy’s music here

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Recorded in May 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars are made from this podcast.

Star Wars / Raquel & Carlos Stecher

Raquel Stecher is joined by her long-suffering husband Carlos to discuss how she finally viewed Star Wars on her own terms. 

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio / Spotify

CREDITS:

Talking Heads:

James David Patrick (@007hertzrumble) – The Empire Strikes Back holds the #1 spot on his Letterboxd.com Top 200.

Raquel Stecher (@RaquelStecher) – Has joined the Rebel Allliance.

Carlos Stecher (@livefastlookgd) – Now committed to watching the BBC’s Pride and Prejudice. 

 
Music Contained in this Podcast:

Preacher Boy – “Shamedown”

20th Century Fox Fanfare

John Williams – “The Star Wars Main Theme”

Cinema Shame Star Wars Shop

Star Wars– BDDVD
Soundtrack: Star Wars Soundtrack
The Making of Star Wars: The Definitive Story Behind the Original Film

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Recorded in May 2019. Copyrights are owned by the artists and their labels. Negative dollars (and sanity) are made from this podcast.