So you’ve finally watched Pulp Fiction…What do you do next?

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My Cinema shame for February is a serious one indeed. Whenever in discussions with my film loving friends there can never be a moment that Pulp Fiction is not mentioned. There is not a conversation that can happen without having the greatest film of all time according to some be brought up. Genius. Masterpiece. Magnum Opus. These are just some of the words used to describe Quentin Tarantino’s Oscar winning 1994 film.

Now that I have finally seen it, am I officially on the bandwagon? My answer is no. Now before I am crucified, let me say that I did not dislike the movie at all. I just did not love it with all my heart and soul as so many others have.

I have finally seen all of Tarrantino’s work. And I am a fan. However when it comes to overall enjoyability, Pulp Fiction is lower on the list of his films. I would personally rank them as follows:

Django Unchained
Kill Bill (Vol 1&2)
Reservoir Dogs
Inglorious Basterds
Pulp Fiction
Death Proof
Jackie Brown

I never have been a fan of films that have multiple stories that are linked together by some common theme. I don’t mind non-linearity so I was fine with that element. I think another thing that I was not a fan of was the dialogue which I know people say is Tarantino’s greatest strength, but I just find it tedious so often throughout the film. I do however love Sam Jackson’s rant. Now I finally know what “Say What again” means.

I did not dislike Pulp Fiction. I just did not see the overwhelming greatness that others have felt. At least I can finally admit to seeing it. I’ll await my condemnation later.

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5 thoughts on “So you’ve finally watched Pulp Fiction…What do you do next?

  1. Very interesting post. I will of course rank ‘Pulp Fiction’ above any other Tarantino work, but that’s maybe because I watched it when I was still relatively young and it is difficult to rearrange one’s choices after some period of time. I know what you mean about different storylines, they can be quite distracting, but I would just give Tarantino an Oscar for the music used in Pulp Fiction. The coolest film soundtrack ever. That should be official 🙂

    • Thank you for the comment. I do agree about the soundtrack. Simply amazing. Crazy thing is I liked the movie but did not love it as others do. I think that could be because I’m not a major fan of crime films. I like them but I like the genres of action and western more hence why I personally rank Django and Kill Bill higher. I think if I had seen 20 years ago rather than recently I would have appreciated it much more as my film senses have developed majorly since 1994.

  2. In the beginning there was only Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. Reservoir Dogs *hinted* at the extend of Tarantino’s prowess. In fact, I never have desire to rewatch RD. When I do, the enterprise feels empty. It’s not the QT movie I want to be watching…. which, really, is any other QT movie except Death Proof.

    I’ve seen Pulp Fiction five times in the theater. Four during it’s original run and once during the recent limited run. I LOVE Pulp Fiction. I can think of no other movie in my lifetime that so heavily influenced the course of contemporary filmmaking trends. But it is impossible for me to remove myself from the moment — the moment in which I first sat there stunned by the transition between “Any of you fucking pricks move… and I’ll execute every motherfucking last one of you” and the blaring horns of “Miserlou.” Chills every time I see it. In those openings minutes of Pulp Fiction I felt like cinema was brand new.

    It wasn’t of course… Tarantino, the ultimate film appreciator, had merely collected his passions and wove them onto the screen into a tapestry of colors and styles that had been around for decades. His success here is visceral. He’s tapping into aural and visual nostalgia — straight from our movie-loving brains.

    But reading your post, I must question — how much of Pulp Fiction is THAT moment in 1994. Pulp Fiction begat a cinematic revolution, a tidal wave of pulp-affected ideas… but if you jumped on that wave midway through the journey, does Pulp Fiction still have the same power?

    Though QT is clearly a filmmaker that brokers widely varied opinions on the value of his work. I, for example, rank PULP FICTION and JACKIE BROWN at the top of the pile. So there is perhaps an angle of approach to consider. That said, even in my least favorite Tarantino films I find much to love.

    • That is a great point and probably the main reason I was not totally wowed when viewing it. I think it’s potency worked it’s best in 94. Now that does not mean the movie hasn’t aged well in 20 years. In fact I think it will never age, but seeing that I have seen a lot of great films beside Pulp Fiction, the wave that it created back then is slightly diminished. For me that is. It is a fantastic film, yet the impact did not stick like I hoped it would when talking to others who have seen in.

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