November – Criterion Collection and Film Struck

For the month of November, the focus for Cinema Shame will be films released through the Criterion Collection and ones available on Filmstruck. With the recent disappointing news of the beloved streaming service discontinuing on November 29, 2018, it would be a great opportunity to support this platform during its final month. If we crash the service from overuse maybe it’ll at least make a statement about the importance of classic film. There have been a lot of recommendations floating around the web on what to watch before the service ends and those suggestions are listed below.

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With the holiday season rolling around, you can always count on Barnes and Noble’s 50%-off Criterion Sale, which starts November 2nd and runs through the entire month. ‘Tis a joyous time when my twitter feed becomes flooded with people stressing about the small things in life… such as which Criterions to purchase, multiple failed attempts to get the clerk to accept a coupon, or the lack of selection at your particular B&N. After those small quibbles, photos appear of recent hauls, creating envy, and influencing wish lists. Should I purchase the Ingmar Bergman box set? My wife says no, but the Internet says YES, A THOUSAND TIMES YES (but only after you’ve sold your already owned Bergman’s to cover the cost). The Criterion sale is a beautiful celebration, but also a double-edged sword of film consumerism.

You may be asking yourself, “So wait… I have to spend money to participate in this Cinema Shame prompt?” Of course not. If you’re like me, someone who owns a large quantity of unwatched Criterions beautifully gathering dust on a shelf, there is no need to purchase more than you already own. (But I probably will.) I know the following discs are upstairs waiting for me: Gilda, Nashville (a long time Cinema Shame), Cat People, His Girl Friday, The Last Temptation of Christ, just off the top of my head.

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As you prepare to pick your Cinema Shames, don’t forget to share watch recommendations and maybe even a few potential blind buys. There is always room on your Criterion shopping list.

A petition has been going around to “Save Filmstruck.” If you enjoy classic cinema I highly recommend signing it. It can’t hurt to let these soulless media conglomerates know that classic film matters. Here’s a link to the “Save FilmStruck” Petition – https://www.change.org/p/warnermedia-keep-filmstruck-alive

FilmStruck Recommendations:

A Classic Film Blog’s Recommendations – @classicmovieblg – https://www.change.org/p/warnermedia-keep-filmstruck-alive

Alicia Malone’s Watchlist on Letterboxd – @aliciamalone – https://letterboxd.com/aliciamalone/list/my-filmstruck-watchlist/

New York Times Recommendations – https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/29/movies/filmstruck-closing-best-movies.html

If you have a Filmstruck To-Watch-Before-Service-Ends List, tell us on twitter @CinemaShame and we’ll send it out through the loudspeakers.

Don’t forget to check out Episode 16 of the Cinema Shame Podcast where James Patrick and Dan Day, Jr. discuss Hammer Horror:

Subscribe on iTunes / Stitcher Radio

Direct Download (right click, save as): http://traffic.libsyn.com/cinemashame/CinemaShame_HammerHorror.mp3

-campbelldropout

October Prompt: Horror, if you must

October is here which brings us to our prompt focusing on the genre of films involving the United Nations to celebrate United Nations Day on October 24th!

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Hold on. I’m getting word that nobody cares about United Nations Day. You goddamn xenophobes. It’s about what? Horror? Well, alright then. Horror it is.

For me personally this is a genre that I’ve always overlooked, I assume its because I’ve seen more bad horror movies than good. I grew up with middle of the road horror in the late 1990s and early 2000s, such as the return of the teen slasher film (Halloween H20, I Know What You Did Last Summer, Urban Legends), a large influx of PG-13 horror movies  (The Ring, What Lies Beneath, Darkness Falls) and a flurry of remakes (The House on Haunted Hill, House of Wax, 13 Ghosts).

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Due to my bad choices, I have some gargantuan Cinematic Shames to hack off the list. This is going to be the month I eviscerate some big ones off the list. Such as John Carpenter’s The Thing, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre and Browning’s Dracula (1931).

The saddest part of that incredibly sad confessions is that I own all of these films. The Thing has been sitting on my self for two years collecting dust. I’m hoping these films will give me a broader foundation for the horror genre. I want to be better!

If you want to do an extreme challenge for this month there is the Hooptober Cinco rules (https://letterboxd.com/cinemonster/list/hooptober-cinco-your-terror-is-a-locked-room/) created by The Cinemonster. There are rules and guidelines but the overall objective is to watch 31 horror films during October. You can view 007hertzrumble’s post about his October plans here.

Let us know what horrible and terrifying Cinema Shames you have planned. Along with that, throw in your Halloween costume ideas. Submit your Shames by tweeting your post to @CinemaShame or emailing us at cinemashame@gmail.com. Use the banners below to tag your posts and spread the horrific October Shame! Or UN Shame. Either way.

-NB

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September Prompt: Burt Reynolds

Our delinquency has been noted. However, we here at Cinema Shame have been grappling with some strong emotions regarding the passing of Burt Reynolds on September 4th. As a result, we’ve scrapped our planned prompt for September — instead we’re going to celebrate Burt.

As one of the great movie stars in the history of Cinema Reynolds’ on-screen career spanned 60 years. Reynolds made his first TV appearance in 1958 on two episodes of a series called Flight.

James wrote a short piece on Burt Reynolds for the Action a Go Go website.

Instead of rehashing a summary of all that text here, we’ll give you the opportunity to link on over and read the piece in its entirely.

The takeaway, in case you don’t feel like a click, is that Burt made a lot of great movies that many movie fans overlook as a result of a populist, good ol’ boy beer swilling, car driving, mustache grinning late 70’s persona. Burt Reynolds made musicals and comedies and action films and detective thrillers, many of which settle into the shadows behind his “Bandit” persona.

Before we turn to horror in the month of October, we’re going to ask you to toss in a few of those Burt Reynolds movies you might have overlooked. Like Smokey and the Bandit? Try Hooper. Did you think that Burt’s career peaked with Deliverance and The Longest Yard? Take a chance on Sharky’s Machine, Hustle or Breaking In. Maybe you prefer the lighter side? He sings and dances (at least better than Pierce Brosnan in Mamma Mia!) in Peter Bogdanovich’s At Long Last Love and makes for a fascinating comic duo with Ryan O’Neal in Nickelodeon. His surprising pairings with Jill Clayburgh in Semi-Tough and Starting Over will make you wonder why they didn’t make a dozen movies together.

We’re asking you, during these last few weeks of September, to set aside some time for Burt. If you need any recommendations for deep cuts, James (@007hertzrumble), as our resident Burt aficionado, will be happy to supply you with a lengthy list of worthy choices.

Rest in Peace, Burt Reynolds. May your movies continue to endure and entertain for generations to come.

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Remember to post your thoughts on your blog or on the pages of the CinemaShame website. We’ll post a roundup at the end of the month featuring the thoughts of all of our grieving moviewatchers. Submit your Shame by tweeting your post to @CinemaShame or emailing us at cinemashame@gmail.com. Look forward to an upcoming episode of the Cinema Shame Podcast featuring a collection of conversations about Burt and his films.

 

–JDP