So 2018 is still shameful.

In 2017 not only did I tackle a great many Shames, I also started the Cinema Shame Podcast. As a result, I checked off some unforeseen Shame and helped others scratch their biggest itches.

As a refresher here was my 2017 list (watched):

The Magnificent Ambersons
Five Easy Pieces
The Gold Rush
It’s a Gift
The Black Pirate
Ride the High Country
My Darling Clementine
The Postman Always Rings Twice
Rope
Lifeboat
Friday the 13th
Stop Making Sense
The Commitments
Viva Las Vegas
Zatoichi: The Long Game (completed Zatoichi 1-10)

Additionally I watched the following as a result of the Podcast:

Fatal Attraction
Godfather Part III

Not too bad, if I do say so myself. But that merely sets up 2018 to be one of the most Shameful years in moviewatching history. The Shame! rolls ever onward. Behind every Shame! is another Shame! and still another and still another… you get the picture.

To compile my list for 2018, I took a slightly different approach. Like past years, I consulted by Entertainment Weekly lists and carried unwatched Shame! over. For 2018, however, I solicited lists from my followers on Twitter. Send me your favorite movies, I said! The first four responses contributed to my 2018 Shame Statement.

My trusty Shame! companion:

EW GUIDE TO THE GREATEST MOVIES EVER MADE

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And now on with the shame.

Five Easy Pieces (Bob Rafelson, 1970) – #20 Drama

fiveeasypieces

Carry over from 2017. I can think of no logical reason I’m avoiding Five Easy Pieces. It’s on my Criterion shelf, readily available.

 

Lifeboat (Alfred Hitchcock, 1944)

lifeboat-movie

More carryover. A few more Hitches and I’ll have seen all of his sound films.

 

Stop Making Sense (Jonathan Demme, 1986) – #15 Music

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Carryover. Sigh. I’ve built this concert film up in my brain so much that I keep waiting for conditions to be perfect for viewing.

 

The Black Pirate (Albert Parker, 1926) – #8 Action

black-pirate-1926-movie-still

I’ve seen my share of Errol Flynn swashbucklers. After seeing Fairbanks’ Zorro on the big screen earlier this year, I’m jazzed to catch up on some of his other films. I’m considering a Quadruple Shame! of The Black Pirate, The Crimson Pirate (1952) starring Burt Lancaster, Vincente Minnelli’s The Pirate (1948), and The Pirate Movie (1982). Maybe I’ll plan an entire week of Pirate movies. Hrm.

 

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (John McNaughton, 1990) – #13 Sci-Fi/Horror

henry-portrait-of-a-serial-killer-review

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I know plenty about this movie and no part of me wants to watch it. I even swapped it out last year for Friday the 13th without hesitation.

 

Paris, Texas (Wim Wenders, 1984) – courtesy of @emily_dawn

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Wenders is a bit of an enigma for me. I’ve seen a couple of his films and they were fine, but I slacked off after that and Paris, Texas fell by the wayside despite *knowing* I needed check this box. When @emily_dawn shared her favorites list with me and I saw Paris, Texas up at the tippy top, I knew its day had come. #DoItForHarry

 

Wuthering Heights (William Wyler, 1939) – courtesy of @Journeys_Film

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All signs pointed to Wuthering Heights this year. The Pure Cinema Podcast recently lauded Wyler’s film. While digging up Orson Welles information for an upcoming Cinema Shame podcast, I read a fair amount of criticism linking Wuthering Heights and The Magnificent Ambersons. Then Kristen came at me with her list of favorites and Bob’s your uncle.

 

Paper Moon (Peter Bogdanovich, 1973) – courtesy of @arbogast1960

paper_moon

No excuses. I love Bogdanovich. I own this movie on Blu-ray. I even have the soundtrack on vinyl. I guess I just needed a kick in the pants from @arbogast1960.

 

Sunrise (F.W. Murnau, 1927) – courtesy of @wez_Luigi

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Another obvious choice. @wez_Luigi made me aware I’d forgotten about F.W. Murnau’s masterpiece.

 

The Conversation (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) – courtesy of @ElCinemonster

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Fuel for an upcoming Cinema Shame episode courtesy of @ElCinemonster.

 

Victor/Victoria (Blake Edwards, 1982) – #24 Comedy

victor-victoria

I consulted the EW Guide for my highest rated unwatched comedy. I’ve been meaning to watch Victor/Victoria for many moons.

 

Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968) – #16 Western

Once Upon a Time in the West 3

Yeah. Clearly an oversight.

 

Ikiru (Akira Kurosawa, 1952)

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I’ve watched a lot of Kurosawa. Clarification. I’ve watched a lot Kurosawa samurai films. I could fill an entire year of Shame! with the non-Samurai Kurosawas I haven’t seen.

 

Help! (Richard Lester, 1965) – #4 Music

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The EW Guide ranked Help! above A Hard Day’s Night. So I had to see about all the fuss.

 

Ongoing Long Plays:

Zatoichi Criterion Box (Various, 1964-1973)

Film_679_ZatoichiSet_original

I watched the first ten last year, time to finish the job.

 

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Shame Statement 2018

Great to be a part of another year of Shame! I actually accomplished quite a bit. I knocked off a good deal of horror films with Friday the 13th being the big one I wrote about. I also watched and wrote about Straw Dogs which was a very unique viewing experience. Now here we are at 2018 and I have a new list of films to partake of for the first time. This year I want to try for a themed approach. This year I want to focus on westerns, my favorite genre. Not every Shame will be a western though. But I do want to add some more of this genre to my cinematic talking points.

Yojimbo/Sanjuro – Akira Kurosawa

The Hidden Fortress – Akira Kurosawa

The Shooting/Ride the Whirlwind – Monte Hellman

The Revenant – Alejandro G. Inarritu

Romancing the Stone – Robert Zemeckis

A History of Violence – David Cronenberg

Hang em High – Ted Post

One Eyed Jacks – Marlon Brando

McCabe and Mrs Miller – Robert Altman (pray for me here as I typically can not stand Altman films)

Pan’s Labyrinth – Guillermo Del Toro

Ghost in the Shell – Mamoru Oshii

Death Rides a Horse – Giulio Petroni

Wyatt Earp – Lawrence Kasdan

So I’m back to fight the evil Shame in ’17

I screwed the pooch last year. I drafted an elaborate Shame Statement from here to Baja, California and I made a wrong turn at Albuquerque. Okay, I lied. I made a wrong turn in Columbus, Ohio, likely when I needed a White Castle fix.

We don’t have any White Castles in Pittsburgh, okay!?!?

I don’t want to get into the ways in which I failed my Shame Statement. It would just be rehashing old wounds. Instead, I’m going to move on. I’m going to move on from 2016 and all that mess and my blown Shame Statement. 2017 is a new year. New Shame. New rules. No more Mr. Nice 007hertzrumble.

Let’s get back to the basics. 12+ movies. 12 months.

I’ve again consulted my handy dandy Entertainment Weekly Guide.

EW GUIDE TO THE GREATEST MOVIES EVER MADE

I’ve lost the benefit of free will this year due to my failings in 2016. For my first Shames, I’m taking the first unwatched entry in each genre and moving forward.

DRAMA:

#1. The Magnificent Ambersons (Orson Welles, 1942) – #16 Drama

magnificent-ambersons

Honestly, I’ve never felt shame for not having seen The Magnificent Ambersons, but the book shames me. So I will oblige.

 

#2. Five Easy Pieces (Bob Rafelson, 1970) – #20 Drama

fiveeasypieces

I’ve planned to watch Five Easy Pieces for years, decades. I’ve just never done. I’ve owned the film on DVD and I just recently upgraded to Blu-ray. That makes sense, right? I’ll watch it twice to make amends. I watched a few clips during film school and the sense of having seen it probably proves detrimental to the actual, legitimate watching.

 

COMEDY:

#3. The Gold Rush (Charlie Chaplin, 1925) – #25 Comedy

annex-chaplin-charlie-gold-rush-the_03

Another film school casualty. In fact, I could probably blame film school for my woeful lack of Chaplin, whereas I’ve devoured both Keaton and Lloyd. Having seen dozens of individual moments from Chaplin films, my memory gets a little foggy regarding the ones I’ve actually watched start to finish.

 

#4. It’s a Gift (Norman C. McLeod, 1934) – #29 Comedy

its-a-gift

The TCM Slapstick Fall class sold me on catching up on my W.C. Fields education. I’ll retitle this section of my Shame Statement “It’s a Shame!”

 

ACTION/ADVENTURE:

#5. The Black Pirate (Albert Parker, 1926) – #8 Action

black-pirate-1926-movie-still

Apparently I’m pretty well versed in Errol Flynn, so the Book has dictated that Douglas Fairbanks requires attention. So it goes.

 

WESTERN:

#6. Ride the High Country (Sam Peckinpah, 1962) – #7 Western

ride-the-high-country-still

There’s only so many times I can write about how I’m going to watch this movie. And I’ve hit that limit. It’s not like I don’t like Peckinpah. I REALLY LIKE PECKINPAH. And it’s not like I haven’t watched dozens of B-level Randolph Scott movies. BECAUSE I’VE WATCHED DOZENS OF B-LEVEL RANDOLPH SCOTT MOVIES.

 

#7. My Darling Clementine (John Ford, 1946) – #10 Western

my-darling-clementine-1946

I bought the Criterion Collection edition of My Darling Clementine for just such a Shameful occasion.

 

MYSTERY/SUSPENSE:

#8. The Postman Always Rings Twice (Tay Garnett, 1946) – #8 Mystery/Suspense

annex-garfield-john-postman-always-rings-twice-the_05

Postman currently resides on my DVR, which is handy.

 

HITCHCOCK

#9. Rope (Alfred Hitchcock, 1948)

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It’s a Hitchcock movie starring my favorite actor. SHAME. All caps.

 

#10. Lifeboat (Alfred Hitchcock, 1944)

lifeboat-movie

I figure one good Hitchcock movie set in one spot deserves another.

 

HORROR:

#11. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer Friday the 13th

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Truth time. I really don’t want to watch this movie. I’ve been told to watch this movie. I’ve read how amazing it is. Everyone seems to think this movie is the absolute bees knees. I’ll save this for October and my 31 Days of Horror Movie Marathon when maybe I can trick myself into watching this by putting it in the Tremors 4 case.

I even recorded a podcast about it. 

MUSIC:

#12. Stop Making Sense (Jonathan Demme, 1986) – #15 Music

stop-making-sense

When one of my favorite bands has done a rockumentary and I haven’t watched it that’s pitch-perfect SHAME, friends.

 

#13. The Commitments (Alan Parker, 1991) – Personal Pick

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This is a movie that fits squarely in the “I’m going to f’ing love this” box and I haven’t seen it. I know it might not be your particular ball and chain, but knowing I haven’t watched this weighs heavily on my conscious.

 

#14. Viva Las Vegas – (George Sidney, 1964) – Elvis Shame

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1964 Elvis and Ann-Margret, directed by George Sidney. Time to fix this oversight.

 

LONG PLAYS:

Zatoichi Criterion Box (Various, 1964-1973)

Film_679_ZatoichiSet_original

I started this endeavor last year. I did not finish. Carry on, Zatoichi.

 

I’m determined to take on 2017 with everything I’ve got. No more Mr. Passive Resistance. I’m here to kick some Shame butt.

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oh, the shame: a confession by @midairalmacita

I’ll admit it.  I’m stubborn.  A bit of a rebel.  When people tell me to do something, I mostly do the exact opposite.  Because I’m an adult, damnit.  Only I was like this as a kid, too.

When people tell me I just have to do this or that, I mostly just roll my eyes.  I’ll do what I want, okay?

So, this way of being has led me to a lifetime of watching really obscure, bizarre movies or hopeless romantic comedies (that are really quite bad) while missing all the “classics” of my generation.  I also attribute my lack of exposure to certain films to my sheltered childhood.  Growing up with very little, we never got to see films in theaters.  I can only really remember watching Crocodile Dundee.  Most of the time, we were stuck with what was on TV.  Basic TV, at that.  (I think we had cable for 3 months during all of my childhood).  By the time I was a teen and could rent movies, I had pretty weird taste in movies. And well, everything.

Now that I’m 35, I’ve realized that I kind of missed out on some pretty fun stuff.  Or seemingly fun (since I haven’t seen these things, I can only assume…people look like these things make them happy).  I’ve also found myself in many conversations where I have no idea what the Hell people are talking about.

I have a thing called a Mighty List, and–at some point–I decided that I wanted to watch a bunch of movies.  I really wanted to expose myself to new things and get out of my comfort zone.  So, this is part of that.  My list is mostly based on other people’s shock when I tell them that I have no knowledge of said films.

Without further ado…

  • Labyrinth (1986) – I attempted to watch this once, back in 2004. My then-fiance was completely perplexed that I hadn’t seen this movie.  He was a big science fiction geek who tried and tried to expand my horizons.  (He once gave me every Kurt Vonnegut book ever simply because I’d never–gasp–read anything from that guy).  I was actually trying really hard to watch the movie–even though I had a hunch I probably wouldn’t like it.  I’m not much of a science fiction/fantasy person, to be honest.  But it was weird, and there was David Bowie–and ooh, Jim Henson.  Yea…totally fell asleep ten minutes in.  Like dead to the world asleep.
  • ET – The Extra Terrestrial (1982) – This is another one my ex-fiance tried to get me to watch…that I tried to watch.  I passed out about 15 minutes in.  This one really took some doing to get me to agree.  I’ll admit–I avoided it on purpose my entire life simply because people said it was an Alma film.
  • Star Wars Original Trilogy (1977) – I think this is the one I get crap about the most.  I’ve had past boyfriends try to convince me to watch it, telling me all about the mythology (which does seem cool).  But I always refused.  I had to draw a line somewhere, and I just couldn’t go there.  I guess I am now a bit more curious about all the fuss.
  • Indiana Jones & the Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) – It just never occurred to me to willingly watch this movie.
  • Inception (2010) – Another movie that all my friends said was an “Alma” movie.  I just could never go there.
  • The Matrix (1999) – I once had a friend who would talk for hours about this movie, and I had no clue what they were even talking about.
  • Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) – Absolutely no excuse. They do midnight showings every weekend at the theater in my neighborhood.
  • The Godfather (1972) – I have absolutely no good reason for avoiding this one all my life.  I actually love a good mob flick.
  • Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) – I actually think I’ll like this one.
  • Bull Durham (1988) – I adore Susan Sarandon, so I pretty much have to see this one.
  • Road House (1989) – For me, Patrick Swayze began and ended with Dirty Dancing.
  • Die Hard (1988) – I still have no clue why this is a Christmas movie.

There you have it.  Make fun of me.  Share awesome romantic comedies.  (I swear I’ve seen all the good ones, and everything else is just terrible).  I’ll keep you posted on my progress!

@Peaceman630, a lifelong procrastinator, ready to face my Cinema Shame

I was a premature baby.

I decided I just had to be born a few weeks early despite the fact that I hadn’t yet finished cooking. Aside from that it’s hard to recall too many things in my life that I haven’t waited until the last possible minute to address or creative projects that I haven’t stretched long past the due date. Case-in-point, here I am writing my first post to this wonderful blog on February 1st. I’m late to the party but happy to be here.

I’ll give you another example: @MisterGreggles, who is my best friend, gave me a DVD of the John C. Reilly film “Hard Eight” back in 2007 for my birthday. I wanted to watch it. I had the time to watch it. But perhaps not the will. Each time we’d hang out he’d ask me if I’d watched the film hoping to engage in a lively discussion on its merits. “Nope, not yet. I’ll get to it eventually though, I promise” was the common refrain. It got to the point where I resolved to watch the film and made a semi-serious, mostly-jokey ultimatum. Something to the effect of: “If I don’t watch this film by the end of the week I will renounce our friendship, that’s how much watching this means to me because I consider you my dearest friend.”

Technically speaking we haven’t been friends since 2007.

In any case, you get the extent to which I need to change my evil ways and I think this blog will be a great opportunity to do so while also meeting you fantastic people and sharing in your stories as well. Thank you to @campbelldropout and @007hertzrumble for allowing me to contribute, and thank you to @mistergreggles for encouraging me to get with the program.

And now the list:

January (oops, already off to a late start) –  The Artist

February – The Stunt Man

March- Smokey and the Bandit

April – Lawrence of Arabia

May – The Man with the Movie Camera

June – Chinatown

July – Jaws

August – High Noon

September – Animal House

October – Rope

November – Breakfast at Tiffanys

December – Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

You’ll notice Hard Eight didn’t make the cut for this year, but don’t worry Greg I’ll get to it eventually.
I promise.

My Cinematic Hall of Shame by @hollye_h

So here they are — the movies I really should have seen by now, or at least I feel I should have seen. There are still gaps. Really, there should be at least one Tarantino film on here, and some Fellini. Should I have added Tod Browning’s Freaks? The original Halloween? And if it stars Tom Cruise, should it bother me that I can’t feel much shame over not having seen it?

Note: These are not necessarily listed in order of Maximum Shame.

1. Network

Probably not a lot of people are walking around saying “I can’t believe you haven’t seen Network!” But I’ve come across enough references I feel like I should have seen it a long time ago. William Holden tells people to yell out the window, right?

2. Dracula (1931)

As a classic horror fan, I should’ve seen this by now.

3. Psycho

Probably the one I’m most embarrassed about. I sat through Torn Curtain. I own Shadow of a Doubt on DVD. But I haven’t seen Psycho?

4. Taxi Driver

Almost as embarrassing as Psycho.

5. Aliens

With an “s”. I’ve seen the first, but everyone keep referencing the second. Plus, I like Bill Paxton.

6. Godfather & Godfather Part II

I don’t know how it happened either.

7. Breathless

All the cool kids have already seen it.

8. Fight Club

Ah, references!

9. 2001: A Space Odyssey

Like Network, it was in the air when I was growing up. And if I don’t watch it now, I probably never will.

10. Repulsion

Rosemary’s Baby has been in my personal top five since I was in my teens. And I loved Knife in the Water when I finally saw it.  So why haven’t I seen Repulsion?

11. The 400 Blows

See #7

12. The Rules of the Game

See #7 & #11

Optional 13th: Last Year at Marienbad. So I can finally justify referencing it on Twitter.

Confession of Shame by @JakeDelToro

I’m sat looking at a list of sixty-one films. Well, I was before I started writing this. Why, you ask?

Well, I’ll come to that. Let me start at the beginning…

A few weeks back while perusing Letterbox’d, I thought I’d make a list of all the movies that I feel like I ‘should’ have seen by now. How do you go about qualifying films for a list like that though? Hmmm, tough question. The answer is as follows; any film that when talking to a fellow film fan would elicit a scathing response such as the one demonstrated here: “WHAT??? You haven’t seen Raging Bull?!? That’s ridiculous, everyone has seen that movie! You need to watch it immediately” So I set about creating such a list, for my own reference, so that I could tick off the films on it as and when I watched them.

Back to me staring at my list…

Earlier this evening (21st January) I spied the following exchange between @007hertzrumble and @campbelldropout:

Tweets

Perfect! I had to get in on the action. And that is why I was sat looking at a list of 61 films.

I was trying to narrow my own list down to just 12 films which I will be watching at a rate of one per month and then writing about the film here. It was quite a difficult process. Essentially, I had to pick one out of every five movies on my list to watch. How do you possibly narrow a list like that down, after all these are all films that are considered ‘classics’. Well eventually I just thought “Bollocks to it” and scanned the list quickly and picked out films that stood out from the pack. Not necessarily the twelve that would be considered the most classic but twelve films that I am genuinely excited to watch and feel could make for an interesting topic to write about. I have tried to make it a varied list taking in many genres and styles.

So here it is:

  1. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  2. The Wild Bunch
  3. When Harry Met Sally
  4. Manhattan
  5. Raging Bull
  6. First Blood
  7. Fargo
  8. A Nightmare on Elm Street
  9. Casablanca
  10. Badlands
  11. Once Upon a Time in The West
  12. My Neighbor Totoro

Over the next twelve months I will be watching these films, one a month, and then documenting my progress and thoughts on the films as I go along.

First up: First Blood.